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Solaris wtmpx not updating

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In today's complex computing environments resource usage reporting is important, but Unix accounting can provide additional security logging capabilities which are invaluable as audit trails.

With some scripting, a nice log-rotation mechanism can be implemented.

Otherwise, you can go through a series of commands to backup the file manually and overwrite it with a clean one. Also make sure /usr/sbin/logadm is being run from your root crontab.

This was likely the sequence used pre Solaris 9 days when logadm came into the picture.~# cd /var/adm/~# /usr/lib/acct/fwtmp I have Solaros 9 SPARC and lately I found that /var/adm/wtmpx is above 3G. Where should I look for settings to rotate /var/adm/wtmpx The /etc/does not contain any line about wtmpx. -Raymond Solaris Tip] Trim wtmpx fileby andy under Filesystem, Tips, UNIX Our root (/) partition is nearing 100% utilization and upon further investigation the wtmpx file is the main culprit.

# 3 - Error from dd detected # # Notes: # This script will make a backup of your files in $TMPDIR # unless there is no truncation to be made, or there is an # error and it bails out.

# Directory to store the temporary copies of the files: # (originally /tmp) #TMPDIR=/tmp TMPDIR=/backup # Directory where the real files are stored: # (originally /var/adm) WDIR=/var/adm # List of files with record sizes, used for the for loop # (originally "wtmp:36 wtmpx:372") FILES="wtmp:36 wtmpx:372" # Number of records to keep if not modified by argument: # (originally 60, or

With some scripting, a nice log-rotation mechanism can be implemented.

Otherwise, you can go through a series of commands to backup the file manually and overwrite it with a clean one. Also make sure /usr/sbin/logadm is being run from your root crontab.

This was likely the sequence used pre Solaris 9 days when logadm came into the picture.~# cd /var/adm/~# /usr/lib/acct/fwtmp I have Solaros 9 SPARC and lately I found that /var/adm/wtmpx is above 3G. Where should I look for settings to rotate /var/adm/wtmpx The /etc/does not contain any line about wtmpx. -Raymond Solaris Tip] Trim wtmpx fileby andy under Filesystem, Tips, UNIX Our root (/) partition is nearing 100% utilization and upon further investigation the wtmpx file is the main culprit.

# 3 - Error from dd detected # # Notes: # This script will make a backup of your files in $TMPDIR # unless there is no truncation to be made, or there is an # error and it bails out.

# Directory to store the temporary copies of the files: # (originally /tmp) #TMPDIR=/tmp TMPDIR=/backup # Directory where the real files are stored: # (originally /var/adm) WDIR=/var/adm # List of files with record sizes, used for the for loop # (originally "wtmp:36 wtmpx:372") FILES="wtmp:36 wtmpx:372" # Number of records to keep if not modified by argument: # (originally 60, or $1 if argument given) KEEP=$ case "$KEEP" in -*) # set skip size for negative arguments SKIP=`echo $KEEP | cut -c2-` ;; *) # accept explicit positives KEEP=`echo $KEEP | cut -c2-` unset SKIP ;; *) unset SKIP ;; esac # get the proper values, since $FILES is customizable.

Sun's software development mantra seems to have been "It Technically Works." Sun seems to have pretty much developed something right up to the point absolutely required of them, and then pretty much stopped there.

So you end up with generally accepted solutions being like these and you just keep a listed collection of workarounds for common problems.

The focus will be on the daily periodic accounting process, though a monthly periodic accounting process is included with Unix accounting.

Each of the topics will be described based on the accounting system available with Solaris® 2.6.

On Solaris, wtmpx contains data such as what IP address a user connects from, when they logged in, and how long they stayed on. I did some research to figure out how to get usable data from it.

The fwtmp command converts the wtmpx records to ascii, making it easy to parse them, for instance, with Awk. It's a stream converter, so it takes the raw wtmpx file as input, and bars out plain text.

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With some scripting, a nice log-rotation mechanism can be implemented.Otherwise, you can go through a series of commands to backup the file manually and overwrite it with a clean one. Also make sure /usr/sbin/logadm is being run from your root crontab.This was likely the sequence used pre Solaris 9 days when logadm came into the picture.~# cd /var/adm/~# /usr/lib/acct/fwtmp I have Solaros 9 SPARC and lately I found that /var/adm/wtmpx is above 3G. Where should I look for settings to rotate /var/adm/wtmpx The /etc/does not contain any line about wtmpx. -Raymond Solaris Tip] Trim wtmpx fileby andy under Filesystem, Tips, UNIX Our root (/) partition is nearing 100% utilization and upon further investigation the wtmpx file is the main culprit.# 3 - Error from dd detected # # Notes: # This script will make a backup of your files in $TMPDIR # unless there is no truncation to be made, or there is an # error and it bails out.# Directory to store the temporary copies of the files: # (originally /tmp) #TMPDIR=/tmp TMPDIR=/backup # Directory where the real files are stored: # (originally /var/adm) WDIR=/var/adm # List of files with record sizes, used for the for loop # (originally "wtmp:36 wtmpx:372") FILES="wtmp:36 wtmpx:372" # Number of records to keep if not modified by argument: # (originally 60, or $1 if argument given) KEEP=$ case "$KEEP" in -*) # set skip size for negative arguments SKIP=`echo $KEEP | cut -c2-` ;; *) # accept explicit positives KEEP=`echo $KEEP | cut -c2-` unset SKIP ;; *) unset SKIP ;; esac # get the proper values, since $FILES is customizable.Sun's software development mantra seems to have been "It Technically Works." Sun seems to have pretty much developed something right up to the point absolutely required of them, and then pretty much stopped there.So you end up with generally accepted solutions being like these and you just keep a listed collection of workarounds for common problems.The focus will be on the daily periodic accounting process, though a monthly periodic accounting process is included with Unix accounting.Each of the topics will be described based on the accounting system available with Solaris® 2.6.On Solaris, wtmpx contains data such as what IP address a user connects from, when they logged in, and how long they stayed on. I did some research to figure out how to get usable data from it.The fwtmp command converts the wtmpx records to ascii, making it easy to parse them, for instance, with Awk. It's a stream converter, so it takes the raw wtmpx file as input, and bars out plain text.

if argument given) KEEP=$ case "$KEEP" in -*) # set skip size for negative arguments SKIP=`echo $KEEP | cut -c2-` ;; *) # accept explicit positives KEEP=`echo $KEEP | cut -c2-` unset SKIP ;; *) unset SKIP ;; esac # get the proper values, since $FILES is customizable.

Sun's software development mantra seems to have been "It Technically Works." Sun seems to have pretty much developed something right up to the point absolutely required of them, and then pretty much stopped there.

So you end up with generally accepted solutions being like these and you just keep a listed collection of workarounds for common problems.

The focus will be on the daily periodic accounting process, though a monthly periodic accounting process is included with Unix accounting.

Each of the topics will be described based on the accounting system available with Solaris® 2.6.

On Solaris, wtmpx contains data such as what IP address a user connects from, when they logged in, and how long they stayed on. I did some research to figure out how to get usable data from it.

The fwtmp command converts the wtmpx records to ascii, making it easy to parse them, for instance, with Awk. It's a stream converter, so it takes the raw wtmpx file as input, and bars out plain text.